The Man on the Flying Trapeze

  • 1934
  • 7m

Popeye comes to ask Olive out, but finds she’s gone off with the title character. Popeye goes to the circus (ringmaster Wimpy) looking for her, to find she’s part of the act; an aerial battl… Read allPopeye comes to ask Olive out, but finds she’s gone off with the title character. Popeye goes to the circus (ringmaster Wimpy) looking for her, to find she’s part of the act; an aerial battle ensues.Popeye comes to ask Olive out, but finds she’s gone off with the title character. Popeye goes to the circus (ringmaster Wimpy) looking for her, to find she’s part of the act; an aerial battle ensues.

Photos

Charles Carver

  • Cat
  • (uncredited)

William Costello

  • Popeye
  • (voice)
  • (uncredited)

Lou Fleischer

  • Wimpy
  • (uncredited)

William Pennell

  • Jules Leotard
  • (voice)
  • (uncredited)

Mae Questel

  • Olive Oyl
  • (voice)
  • (uncredited)

Gus Wicke

  • Jules Leotard
  • (uncredited)

Featured review

Popeye at the circus

Dave Fleischer was responsible for many gems. Ones that were amusing and charming, though over-cuteness did come through in some efforts and the stories were always pretty thin, with appealing characters, outstanding music and visuals that were inventive and with innovative animation techniques.
‘The Man on the Flying Trapeze’ is not quite one of the best Popeye cartoons to me. It is extremely well done though and has a lot going for it. Have always enjoyed many of the Popeye cartoons a good deal and like Popeye very much, Fleischer’s efforts were always well animated and scored with lots of entertainment value and great chemistry between the characters. ‘The Man on the Flying Trapeze’ has much of what makes the Popeye series so appealing in its prime era and does nothing to waste the three main characters or make them less interesting. Bluto is missed but Wimpy works well here.
The story is an interesting and beautifully paced one, never being dull, if formulaic (not uncommon with the Popeye cartoons). The material make it even more entertaining, ‘The Man on the Flying Trapeze’ is non-stop fast-paced fun, avoiding the trap of repetition. It has to be said though that the titular character is a bland one and the one exception to the animation being good, unappealingly and hastily drawn.
The characters are great generally, apart from the titular character. There is a lot of energy here and the danger and excitement of the circus setting is well realised. Popeye is always amusing and likeable and Wimpy is great support and the best character here. The circus is like its own character too.
Furthermore, the animation is beautifully drawn and with enough visual detail to not make it cluttered or static and lively and smooth movement. The music is also outstanding, lots of merry energy and lush orchestration, adding a lot to the action and making the impact even better without being too cartoonish. Fleischer’s direction is always accomplished and his style is all over it.
Voice acting is dynamic and of very good quality, Mae Questel is a good fit for Olive Oyl, the voice that most sticks in my mind for the character and who voiced her the best, but William Costello is even better.
Overall, very good. 8/10 Bethany Cox

‘The Man on the Flying Trapeze’ is not quite one of the best Popeye cartoons to me. It is extremely well done though and has a lot going for it. Have always enjoyed many of the Popeye cartoons a good deal and like Popeye very much, Fleischer’s efforts were always well animated and scored with lots of entertainment value and great chemistry between the characters. ‘The Man on the Flying Trapeze’ has much of what makes the Popeye series so appealing in its prime era and does nothing to waste the three main characters or make them less interesting. Bluto is missed but Wimpy works well here.

The story is an interesting and beautifully paced one, never being dull, if formulaic (not uncommon with the Popeye cartoons). The material make it even more entertaining, ‘The Man on the Flying Trapeze’ is non-stop fast-paced fun, avoiding the trap of repetition. It has to be said though that the titular character is a bland one and the one exception to the animation being good, unappealingly and hastily drawn.

The characters are great generally, apart from the titular character. There is a lot of energy here and the danger and excitement of the circus setting is well realised. Popeye is always amusing and likeable and Wimpy is great support and the best character here. The circus is like its own character too.

Furthermore, the animation is beautifully drawn and with enough visual detail to not make it cluttered or static and lively and smooth movement. The music is also outstanding, lots of merry energy and lush orchestration, adding a lot to the action and making the impact even better without being too cartoonish. Fleischer’s direction is always accomplished and his style is all over it.

Voice acting is dynamic and of very good quality, Mae Questel is a good fit for Olive Oyl, the voice that most sticks in my mind for the character and who voiced her the best, but William Costello is even better.

Overall, very good. 8/10 Bethany Cox

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  • TheLittleSongbird
  • Aug 25, 2018

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The Man on the Flying Trapeze (1934)

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By what name was The Man on the Flying Trapeze (1934) officially released in Canada in English?

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