Polar Graphs are best-suited for displaying comparison insights into your data.

Why?

The charts are amazingly easy to interpret. Essentially, they use a strategic combination of colors and coordinates to compare key data points.

Google Sheets is one of the data visualization tools used widely across the world. The main reason why the tool is incredibly popular among professionals and business owners is that it’s free of charge.

But Google Sheets does not have Polar Graphs. Yes, you read that right.

It turns out you can visualize your data using Polar Graphs in your Google Sheets.

How?

All you need is to download and install a particular third-party application (add-on) to access ready-made and visually appealing Polar Graphs.

A system of coordinates in which the location of a point is determined by its distance from a fixed point at the center of the coordinate space (called the pole), and by the measurement of the angle formed by a fixed line (the polar axis, corresponding to the x-axis in Cartesian coordinates) and a line from the pole through the given point. The polar coordinates of a point are given as (r, θ), where r is the distance of the point from the pole, and θ is the measure of the angle.

The chart shares immense similarities with the multilayered Donut Chart. In other words, interpreting this chart is just as easy as getting insights from any other Chart.

Each layer is more prolonged than the preceding one. In addition, each layer has a varying radius and angle.

Like a Radar chart, the layers in this chart represent the changes in variables in your data. So, the sizes of the almost circular depict the magnitude of change in variables.

The visualization design has multiple monikers, such as the Spider or Web Chart.

In the next section, we’ll address the following question: what is a Polar curve?

Polar curves (also known as Radar Charts) can help you understand plot equations with a different coordinate system.

The curve results from the polar equation defined by r and θ.

Use polar grids or polar planes to plot the polar curve and this graph is defined by all sets of (r, θ), that satisfy the given polar equation, r=f(θ).

In the coming section, we’ll expound more on graphs of polar equations.

Plotting a Polar equation is similar to rectangular equations.

When plotting rectangular equations by point-plotting, you normally pick values for x and then evaluate the equation to determine its corresponding y value.

If the polar equation has a general form of r=a±bcosθ or r=a±bsinθ, where a,b>0, its curve becomes a limacon (it’s French for snail).

Check out the variations of Limacons below.

If the polar equation has a general form of r=acos(nθ) or r=asin(nθ), where a≠0, its curve is a Rose.

Each segment of the chart is called rose petals. And the number of petals depends on whether n is even or odd.

If the polar equation has a general form of r2=a2cos2θ or r=a2sin2θ, where a≠0, its curve is a Lemniscate.

There are a plethora of tools out there you can use to visualize your data using a Polar Graph equation.

Google Sheets is one of them.

It’s very understandable why people trust Google Sheets as their chosen tool for visualizing data. For starters, the tool has been there for decades. Furthermore, Google Sheets’s interface is familiar and friendly to a majority of business owners and professionals.

But, generating Polar Graph equations in Google Sheets is not a walk in the park. Google Sheets lacks ready-made Polar Graphs you can use to visualize data.

Besides, customizing existing charts to create a Polar Visualization is time-consuming and complex.

Here’s the kicker.

You don’t have to do away with Google Sheets. You can simply download and install a third-party add-in called ChartExpo.

What is ChartExpo?

ChartExpo is loaded with a ready-to-use Polar Graph equation Chart, plus many insightful and visually-appealing advanced graphs such as Pareto Chart, Likert Scale Chart, Sankey Chart, etc.

You don’t have to be armed with coding/programming skills to use ChartExpo. In fact, you only need basic knowledge of visualization to operate the Google Sheets add-on without hitches.

This section will use a Polar Graph equation to display insights into the table below.

Period Inventory Sales
Previous Paints 612
Previous Garden tools 553
Previous Plumbing Items 628
Previous Electrical Supplies 594
Previous Power tools 604
Current Paints 949
Current Garden tools 956
Current Plumbing Items 559
Current Electrical Supplies 922
Current Power tools 903

To Get Started with the Polar Graph in Google Sheets, install the ChartExpo add-on for Google Sheets from the link, and then follow the simple and easy steps below.

Now click on the Edit Chart button, click on the right top section Chart Settings then find Chart Type and Select “Polar” from the drop-down. This Radar Chart visualization will be converted into Polar Graph.

Below will be a look of the Polar Chart.

As you can see there is no dollar sign with the data values, you can add prefixes with values by again clicking on Edit Chart and then finding the pencil icon near the data values and clicking on it.

Similarly, you can add a header on top of this chart and show a legend from the properties. If you follow the instructions above, your Polar Graph should look like the below:

A Polar Graph equation is a version of Bar Graphs plotted on a polar coordinate system rather than a Cartesian one.

You can use the chart to display trends, patterns, and relationships of key variables in your data. The chart is best suited for visualizing bulky data.

Polar Graphs are best-suited for displaying comparison insights into your data.

The charts are amazingly easy to interpret. Essentially, they use a strategic combination of colors and coordinates to compare key data points.

Google Sheets is one of the data visualization tools used widely across the world. The main reason why the tool is incredibly popular among professionals and business owners is that it’s free of charge.

But Google Sheets does not have Polar Graphs.

To access ready-made Polar Graph equations, we recommend you install third-party apps, such as ChartExpo, into your Google Sheets.

ChartExpo is an add-on you can easily download and install in your Google Sheets app. The tool comes loaded with ready-to-use Polar Charts, plus over 50 more ready-to-go visualization designs.

Sign up for a 7-day trial to enjoy unlimited access to ready-to-go and visually appealing Polar Charts.

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