Data is precious in today’s world, especially in understanding performance, customers, and markets.

But, let’s face it. Crunching numbers is not an exciting and engaging activity.

And this means it’s crucial to explore ways to present raw data in compelling and understandable ways.

Google Sheets has an x y Chart template you can use to visualize your data for insights. However, this chart is pretty basic and requires a lot of time and work in customization. Besides, creating this chart (Scatter Plot) is not as straightforward as it seems.

It turns out you can supercharge your Google Sheets with add-ons to access ready-made, insightful, and easy-to-read x y charts (also known as Scatter Plot).

This blog will walk you through steps to follow when integrating your Google Sheets with third-party add-ons to access more charts. You’ll also discover more using our easy-to-follow x y Graph examples using Google Sheets.

You don’t want to skip the body of the blog if your goal is to take your spreadsheet game to the next level.

Before we dive into the how-to guide, let’s define the x y Graph.

Sometimes, there’re relationships between critical metrics in your data. And understanding these relationships can help you uncover actionable insights.

For instance, if you’re a human resource professional, the relationship between training hours and employee productivity is one of the issues you keep track of closely.

The relationship between the number of people working in a shift and the average answer time is a significant point of interest for many call center managers.

An x y Graph (Scatter plot) is a visualization type you can use if your goal is to extract relationship insights in your data. This easy-to-read chart uncovers relationships you cannot see using tables and visualization designs, such as Bar Chart.

This chart uses dots to represent crucial data points. The position of each dot on the horizontal and vertical axis indicates values for data points.

Use this chart to visualize the relationship between two variables in your data.

Seasoned visualization experts use Scatter Plots mainly to test hypotheses. And this occurs during the initial stages of data visualization. If you want to extract micro insights in your bulky data, give this chart a try.

Take a look at the x y Graph example below.

How to make an x y Graph in Google Sheets does not have to be time-intensive. Keep reading to learn more.

Remember, there’s a ton of charts and graphs you can use to visualize your data for insights. However, choosing the best depends on a broader range of factors, such as your goal and context.

Check out below to learn the best scenarios to apply Scatter Plots.

Plotting this chart helps you determine whether there’s a potential relationship between critical metrics in your data. In fact, Scatter Plots’ primary uses are to observe and show relationships between two numeric variables.

The dots in a Scatter Plot reports the trend and patterns of the data as well.

No problem comes out of the blue.

There has to be a causal factor. For instance, customer complaints in a restaurant arise primarily to issues, such as hygiene and customer service.

An x y Graph is strategically positioned to extract causal-effect insights. You can easily identify how a variable contributes directly to a money-draining problem, such as customer returns.

You can use this chart to explore hidden relationships between dependent and independent variables in your data.

Use an x y Chart to visualize the relationship of data points that pair well naturally, such as sales revenue and profits. In this scenario, you’ll be looking for the nature of the relationship, which can be positive or negative.

How to make an x y Graph in Google Sheets does not have to be complex and stressful. Find out more.

Use an x y Graph to enjoy a ton of insight-centered benefits. Check them out below:

Let’s agree on this. Use an x y Graph example only when you want to visualize correlational relationships in your data. Your data should have at least 2 variables with causal effect relationships. These relationships between variables can be:

As we said, how to make an x y Graph in Google Sheets does not have to be a stressful affair. We got you covered with tips gathered from data visualization experts.

Keep reading because you don’t want to miss this.

How to make an x y Graph in Google Sheets is not as straightforward as it sounds. This spreadsheet application has a Scatter Plot that’s pretty basic.

Essentially, the chart produced requires a lot of time and work in terms of customizations. Some of the controls for customizing Scatter Plots are buried too deep for you to easily access.

And this means you can spend a lot of time visualizing your data with the x y Graph in Google Sheets.

The solution is not to ditch your beloved Google Sheets. You have the option of supercharging it with a third-party add-on.

There’re over 2,000 add-ons available for Google Sheets. We’ve tested about 50 of them, which are primarily for data visualization.

The best add-on we recommend to you is ChartExpo.

ChartExpo scores excellently in all the areas (in our checklist). Unlike other data visualization-based add-ons, ChartExpo does not require coding or programming skills.

Yes, you read that right.

It has a super-friendly user interface for everyone to use irrespective of their computer skills. Secondly, it has 50+ advanced charts you’ll never find in your Google Sheets.

ChartExpo is has a free trial. Besides, it produces charts that are incredibly easy to read and understand. Another thing we’ve noted with this tool is that it does not slow your browser down.

How to make an x y Graph in Google Sheets does not have to consume much of your time. Keep reading to discover more with the x y Graph example (in the next section).

Let’s use a Scatter Plot in ChartExpo to visualize the tabular data below.

States Products Sales Profit % Number of orders
Florida Adidas 5320 31 423
Florida Under Armor 6359 17 522
Florida Skechers 4465 24 981
Florida ASICS Corporation 2825 17 624
Florida Saucony 7796 23 993
Florida Avia 3848 28 752
Florida British Knights 5820 23 981
Florida Brooks Sports 1109 16 973
Virginia Adidas 4309 38 662
Virginia Under Armor 3149 29 561
Virginia Sketchers 4194 11 436
Virginia ASICS Corporation 3919 21 951
Virginia Saucony 1282 24 990
Virginia Avia 3246 14 302
Virginia British Knights 1791 38 656
Virginia Brooks Sports 3087 23 467
Texas Adidas 4923 37 540
Texas Under Armor 4644 15 986
Texas Sketchers 1652 9 469
Texas ASICS Corporation 6343 31 522
Texas Saucony 3163 36 692
Texas Avia 1136 37 990
Texas British Knights 6615 12 822
Texas Brooks Sports 2669 26 655

Labels in each dot make the Scatter Plot look cluttered. To do away with these labels, follow the simple steps below:

To add prefixes and postfixes, such as percentage and currency symbols, follow the simple steps below:

As we said, how to make an x y Graph in Google Sheets should not stress you or even consume a ton of your valuable time. To add a title in your chart, follow the simple steps below.

Like we said, how to make an x y Graph in Google Sheets should not be a time-consuming affair.

Use an x y Graph (also known as Scatter Plot) to visualize relationships between key metrics in your data.

This chart uses dots to represent values for two different numeric variables. The position of each dot on the horizontal and vertical axis indicates values for an individual data point.

Google Sheets has an inbuilt x y Graph that’s pretty basic and requires a lot of work in customizations and editing.

To overcome the problem (above), supercharge your Google Sheets with add-ons, such as ChartExpo, to access insightful and easy-to-interpret Scatter Plot Charts.

How to make an x y Graph in Google Sheets does not have to be time-consuming.

We’ve just covered this (above) in great detail. So if you’ve just landed here, we suggest you take your sweet time to read valuable tips about how to make an x y Graph in Google Sheets faster and easier.

The Scatter Plot is one of the charts that are easy to read and understand.

What’s the best tool to use to visualize data using an x y Graph example?

Google Sheets is one of the most-used tools for visualizing data. Besides, it comes loaded with a Scatter Plot, which is very basic.

So what’s the solution?

We recommend our readers to use the ChartExpo because it’s one of the most trusted add-ons. And, it has over 15,000+ users scattered across the world. Besides, it has a super-friendly user interface for everyone to use irrespective of their computer skills level.

Create simple and easy-to-interpret Scatter Plot charts today without breaking a sweat or wasting your time.

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