The most revered words are adverbs, which modify adjectives and even other adverbs if used correctly.

With so many adverbs used daily in professional and private settings, a handful of those start with the letter E.

Adverbs are friends with verbs and usually stand together.

This article is focused on the most common adverbs with E as their starting letter and examples.

The Most Common Adverbs That Start with the Letter E

Each

We are starting strong with one of the most common adverbs that begins with the letter E, used by everyone and anyone, depending on the situation.

We use the adverb each when we are explaining every one or two things or people, identifying the subject separately.

“There are five piles of leaflets – please take one of each.”

“Each and every one of the people here is my friend.”

“The bill is $50, which is $26 each.”

We can also use it as a phrase to explain people’s likes, dislikes, and preferences, usually when we do not agree with someone else’s choice.

Examples show various possessive adjectives and pronouns.

“I would have chosen something more comfortable, but each to their own.”

“Personally, I would never drive a truck, but to each his own.”

We can also agree that something is not up to our taste, but without sounding offensive, for example:

“Her face does not suit heavy-looking makeup but to each her own.”

We use a popular pronoun that starts with each to refer to the relationship, action, or doings between two or more members of the group.

“They love each other.”

“They communicate with each other in Spanish.”

Eagerly

We use the adverb eagerly to emphasize a desire to say or do something – similar to the adverbs impatiently when someone cannot wait to say or do something and excitedly when someone shows a positive feeling towards an action, subject, or object.

“He waved his hand eagerly until the professor noticed it.”

The student could not wait for the professor to call his name because he was sure of the correct answer.

“Your new project will be one of the most eagerly awaited movies this year.”

“We have eagerly waited for your arrival.”

Easily

The adverb easily derives from the more formal adjective, easy. This adverb explains something that does not require much effort or hard work to succeed.

However, the adverb explains the process of an action finished with little to no difficulty, awkwardness, trouble, or discomfort.

“She passed the test easily.”

“I am easily embarrassed.”

“The line at the back moved along easily.”

If you wish to emphasize why someone managed to do something to or with someone else, you can say:

“She convinced her dad easily because he would do anything for his favorite child.”

This adverb does not require constant use in conversational sentences, whereas we use easy instead.

“I make basketball look easy.” or “She easily manages to score a point.”

East

We can use the word east as a noun, an adjective, and an adverb.

The use depends on the explanation or the point of the conversation, based on the talker.

The definition of the east, when used as an adverb, is simple.

“Drive east until you reach the river.”

“She lives 20 miles east of Paris.”

In these examples, the adverb is used as a measure of distance rather than a place, further explaining the subject’s position.

Another form is eastwards, meaning towards the east.

“Her garden extends eastwards towards her neighbors.”

Eerily

We can focus on some negative connotations with the adverb eerily, which translates to something done in an unnatural, frightening, or creepy way.

“The airport looks eerily quiet this late.”

But the adverb is usually used to explain mysterious or strange behavior.

“She looked eerily calm, almost like she was not breathing.”

“There is something eerily wrong with this house.”

We cannot pinpoint what is exactly wrong with the house, but the overall energy makes your skin crawl.

Some of the synonyms for eerily are more often used than the adverb – creepily, bizarrely, mysteriously, chillingly.

Eerily is an excellent way to elevate your professional and literature writing.

Effortlessly

When you are doing something with minimal mental or physical exertion, we can say that you are doing it effortlessly.

This notion could be related to action, but the adverb explains manners, easygoing nature, or strength.

“She picked up the child effortlessly and put him on the bed.”

“He finished the assignment effortlessly.”

“If you want to transform your bedroom quickly and effortlessly, think about moving your furniture around.”

You do not have to make any effort to make your house look modern, as it is enough to move a chair to the window or use an area rug to freshen it up.

Elegantly

The most common adverb used to describe someone who behaves delicately, graciously, and ladylike is elegantly.

This adverb summons the elegant way the person behaves, talks, walks, or does anything with grace and in a smooth style.

“Anna was elegantly dressed, with high heels and a cocktail dress appropriate for the wedding.”

“He picked the cup elegantly with his long fingers.”

The notion does not focus on one gender, as it does not limit to just something you can see or hear.

“Adam likes the conversations where he can be elegantly witty with his jokes.”

His jokes are pleasing and ingenious because Adam knows how to master them in a simple but funny manner.

Emotionally

If we wish to explain someone or something with strong emotions, rather than using various nouns and adjectives, we can say:

“She cried out emotionally when she saw her baby.”

Strong emotions are present, no matter if they are feelings of happiness, sadness, disgust, grief, or anger.

“His body language showed that he was reacting emotionally to disappointment, but his face was stoic.”

Besides voicing emotions, it can relate to a relationship with someone.

“Sarah did not want to get emotionally attached to him, so she left before falling in love.”

In this way, Sarah felt an intense infatuation with her partner, but she did not want to allow herself to fall in love with him. So, she left before it was too late.

Ethically

The adverb ethically relates to moral principles that someone picks apart before deciding or doing anything.

This behavior depends on doing what is morally correct, no matter the initial thought.

“He taught his students to think for themselves and act ethically in everything situation.”

The professor believes doing the right thing is always more beneficial to his students, even if they deter from their original path.

“Her action was ethically wrong, but she could not correct her mistakes.”

Sometimes our actions might differ from our principles, but it is crucial to finish everything properly and righteously, according to the standards of conduct.

Other Adverbs Starting with the Letter E

Eagerly

Earnestly

Efficiently

Either

Electronically

Eccentrically

Eclectically

Edgewise

Editorially

Egoistically

Elastically

Eloquently

Emphatically

Eminently

Empirically

Enormously

Encouragingly

Entirely

Endemically

Endlessly

Endurably

Endways

Engrossed

Enigmatically

Enjoyably

Enlightened

Enough

Enticingly

Enthusiastically

Epidemically

Epigrammatically

Equivalently

Equivocally

Erroneously

Ere

Erectly

Especially

Essentially

Ethnographically

Ethereally

Ethnically

Euphemistically

Euphoniously

Euphorically

Evenly

Eventually

Evilly

Evidently

Exactly

Exceedingly

Exclusively

Explicitly

Extensively

Extraordinary

Externally

Extra

Exuberantly

Exultantly

Extremely

Exceedingly

Expediently

Exotically

Experiencedly

Expertly

Experimentally

Explosively

Extemporarily

Extendedly

Extravagantly

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